September 9th 2012. By Lenny Rudow.

Maritimo M73 Cruising Motoryacht: Entertain and Cruise in Luxury

The M73 Cruising Motoryacht strikes a balance between interior space and access to the great outdoors, while providing eye-opening performance.

Why is it that two of Australia’s best-known yacht brands, Maritimo and Riviera, were both founded by the same man? It could be that Bill Barry-Cotter has more business smarts than other boatbuilders. It could be that he’s been just plain lucky. Or it could be that he has an understanding of what mariners want. And if what you want is the ideal mix of exterior entertaining space, interior luxury, and accommodations in a motoryacht that’s fit to be called a cruiser, the chances are you and Bill want the same things out of a yacht like Maritimo’s flagship, the M73.

 

Maritimo M73 at sunset

Don't let the M73 model designation fool you; this yacht is over 81 feet long, has a beam of nearly 22 feet, and displaces over 110,000 pounds. It also has a fuel capacity topping 2,500 gallons, so you don't have to make the big range-for-speed sacrafice that many relatively fast motoryachts in this class require.

 

cruising motoryacht caterpillar C32

The M73 is powered by a pair of twin 1,527-HP Caterpillar C32 diesels. With a nine-degree shaft angle and a variable-degree deadrise hullform, they provide a cruise of 30 knots.

 

galley maritimo yachts

Like others in the Maritimo line, the M73 has a galley aft in the salon, on the starboard side. Though unusual on boats of this nature, this layout allows everyone to participate in conversation during meal preps and places the galley in one of the most stable areas of the boat, reducing spills and messes. The entire port side of the salon is dedicated to seating and dining areas.

 

state room

The four stateroom/four head layout includes a full-beam master. Two of the other three staterooms feature queen berths, and all have unusually large hanging lockers. Thanks to a combination of large hullside ports and overhead hatches, they also enjoy plenty of natural lighting.

 

running shot of maritimo m73

Thanks to a deep recessed walkaround, the bowdeck is a useable area and transitioning from bow to stern is safe and comfortable. Once you get where you're going, transitioning from yacht to land is also easy - a tender stows in a garage, under the cockpit.

 

flying bridge flybridge

On the M73 the enclosed flybirdge is more than a place to run the boat, it's also an entertaining area. In fact, there's even a day-head on the bridge - a rarity on any cruiser in this class.

 

helm station electronics

The helm has plenty of room for a multi-screen electronics suite, and is finished in a glare-reducing black matte. When equipped with Twin Disk Quickshift transmissions, the bow thruster can be integrated with the engines for complete joystick control. Dockside manuevering with this system is as easy and intuative as it gets.

 

cockpit exterior

Cockpit space, often sorely lacking on motoryachts, is plentiful on the M73. Note the extensive LED lighting, over-sized stainless-steel rails, cleats, and table supports, and the beefy sliding doors.

 

M73 motoryachts

Engine and fuel tank placement is designed to locate as much weight as possible over the boat's center of buoyancy. This maximizes stability while reducing bowrise and trim variations due to changing loads. International buyers will want to note that the M73 meets ISO 9001 standards - and Maritimo is the only production builder in Australia with this accredation.

 

Some will want less space dedicated to the cockpit and walkaround, and more cabin for the LOA. Others will care less for speed, and more for efficiency. But those in search of a cruising motoryacht which finds a way to mix all of these characteristics together without sacraficing one iota of luxury may well end their search with the M73 – and that’s probably just what Bill has in mind.



Lenny Rudow
Lenny Rudow is Senior Editor for Dominion Marine Media, including Boats.com and Yachtworld.com. With over two decades of experience in marine journalism, he has contributed to publications including Boating Magazine, Marlin Magazine, Boating World, Saltwater Sportsman, Texas Fish & Game, and many others. Lenny is a graduate of the Westlawn School of Yacht Design who has won 28 BWI and OWAA writing awards.