April 24th 2012. By Lenny Rudow.

Bray 42M Ocean Explorer: Next-Generation Megayacht

This new design from Bray Yacht Design and Research brings environmental responsibility to the megayacht realm.

Even for a forward-thinking yacht designer like Patrick Bray, coming up with a “green” megayacht is no small challenge. But the new design for the Bray 42M Ocean Explorer is as green as the most hydrodynamic of hybrids.

As futuristic-looking as it is forward-thinking, the Bray 42M proves it’s possible to be simultaneously grand in stature and green in thinking.

Bray makes use of a bulbous bow, bifoil skegs, midships bulbs, and stern bulbs to reduce resistance. The appendages account for fifteen percent of the yacht’s displacement volume, which allows the hull to be narrower and shallower, further reducing resistance. Outfitted with hybrid diesel/electric powerplants, the Bray 42M is expected to be able to cruise along on battery power alone at a speed of six knots, for up to five hours at a clip. Planned cruising speed is 14 knots, with a 16 knot top-end. Even the interior of the boat is designed to be green, built with eco-friendly materials.

Bray 42M specificationsThough this yacht is intended to have a smaller than usual carbon footprint, don’t think for a moment that it’ll sacrifice one iota of luxury or adventure. The massive aft deck can be fitted for a seaplane, helicopter, mini-sub, or even a sportfishing boat; there’s room for a hot tub on the flybridge; and accommodations includes four staterooms with en suite heads plus crew quarters. A full-width salon features 270-degree views through windows and sliding glass doors leading to the aft deck. Ain’t it grand, being green?



Lenny Rudow
Lenny Rudow is Senior Editor for Dominion Marine Media, including boats.com and YachtWorld. With over two decades of experience in marine journalism, he has contributed to publications including Boating Magazine, Marlin Magazine, Boating World, Saltwater Sportsman, Texas Fish & Game, and many others. Lenny is a graduate of the Westlawn School of Yacht Design, and he has won numerous BWI and OWAA writing awards.